2019 Honored Veterans

Emanuel Manny Blosio

U.S. Army

Manny’s story began in Italy, but quickly moved to Stamford when at just six months old his mother brought him and his two sisters to join his father here. He happily remembers his very American childhood, growing up on the West Side, playing baseball with friends at Hatch Field, football on Richmond Hill and spending time with the CYO at Sacred Heart Church. His first “military” experience was as a Boy Scout during World War II, when he helped check neighborhood houses for lights during air raid drills.

After attending Stevens School and Cloonan Jr. High, Manny graduated from Stamford High and joined the Naval Reserves in 1949. Two years later he decided to join the Army instead, and after training at Fort Dix, he saw combat in the Korean War from 1951 to 1954. Then, right after his very fortunate safe return, Manny’s good luck really blossomed when on a trip to the dentist he met his future wife of 62 years, Rosemarie Marrucco, where she was working as a hygienist.

Soon after, Manny went to the University of Bridgeport where he earned his bachelor’s degree in Industrial Design and then a Master’s in Education, which turned out to be his true calling. A magnificent teaching career began with Fine Arts at Turn of River, then Fine Arts and Stage Craft at Rippowam High and then Rippowam Cluster High School. As a co-founder of B.E.S.T (Board of Education Summer Theater), Manny mentored many young students, aspiring actors and stage hands, who still keep in touch with him today.

Manny was never one to idle. He was active in the Boy Scouts, coached Babe Ruth Baseball, worked the Board of Rec playgrounds, supported the Westhill Blue Line Club and was a volunteer for the St. Cecilia Youth Group. He was a member of the Stamford Senior Men’s Club, the Italian Center, a past Grand Knight of the Father Miller Council, Knights of Columbus, and is now a member of the Southern Fairfield County Retired Teachers Association. Manny still enjoys golf, breakfast at Dutchess with “the guys” and seeing his many friends and relatives.

Most of all, Manny and Rosemarie love spending time with their four children Richard (Allison) Blosio, Robert (Pamela) Blosio, Randy (Lisa) Blosio and Robyn (Paul) Bova, their eleven grandchildren (one on active duty, one veteran) and one great grandchild. Manny says that he wishes the Scholarship winners “a very happy, successful college career and much success in life”.

Donald Hunter

U.S. Army

The famous but tragic fate of the five Sullivan brothers, who made the ultimate sacrifice together on the U.S.S. Juneau in World War II, had to be weighing on Maebelle Hunter’s mind when five of her eleven children all joined the military in the middle of the Vietnam War. Henry “Buddy” Hunter, the eldest of the five, joined the Air Force ahead of Donald, Randy, Larry and Lenny, who all volunteered for the Army Signal Corps at a time when many other young men were looking for ways to avoid the unpopular and treacherous trip to the jungles of Indochina. Close throughout their childhood on Spruce Street on Stamford’s West Side, the Hunter brothers were not about to let a mere war come between them.

Donald, the middle child of the five, spent one year in-country, running weapons in Lu Binh. Assigned to an area of heavy fighting, Donald was awarded the Bronze Star, though he prefers to let the history of his heroics remain within him. His Stamford childhood, on the other hand, is something he is happy to reminisce about and share. Losing their father when Donald was just seven, Maebelle Hunter faced the enormous challenge of being a single mother of eleven working long hours as a domestic. But Donald says Spruce Street “was a neighborhood full of mamas”, so getting in trouble was not an option. Of Maebelle, he recalls, she was tough, but that “she was the most beautiful woman in the world.”

The brothers have remained close. For years Donald hosted horseshoe matches at his home, and claims to be the champ. While that may be disputed by his brothers, there is no argument that Henry, Randy, Donald, Larry and Lenny, as members of the same bowling team for twenty five years, won the Connecticut State U.S.B.C Open Tournament in 2012!

Donald worked at the Stamford Marriott for many years until his retirement. He and his wife of 48 years, Shirley, still live in Stamford and have eight children, eleven grandchildren and ten greatgrandchildren. When asked if they are all still close, Donald says with a smile “Close? I can’t get rid of ‘em!”

Stamford COTY understands why Donald Hunter’s family likes to be around him and is happy to recognize him as a distinguished veteran.

Larry Hunter

U.S. Army

The famous but tragic fate of the five Sullivan brothers, who made the ultimate sacrifice together on the U.S.S. Juneau in World War II, had to be weighing on Maebelle Hunter’s mind when five of her eleven children all joined the military in the middle of the Vietnam War. Henry “Buddy” Hunter, the eldest of the five, joined the Air Force ahead of Donald, Randy, Larry and Lenny, who all volunteered for the Army Signal Corps at a time when many other young men were looking for ways to avoid the unpopular and treacherous trip to the jungles of Indochina. Close throughout their childhood on Spruce Street on Stamford’s West Side, the Hunter brothers were not about to let a mere war come between them.

Larry, the ninth of Maebelle’s eleven children, attended Stevens School, Cloonan and Rogers Junior High, before graduating with the 100th graduating class of Stamford High School in 1965. As a kid, Larry says the five boys were very close: “We were called the little kids. I used to joke that they called us that because they didn’t know our names. We just always did things together.” He joined the U.S. Army in 1966 and entered basic training in Fort Jackson, S.C. before deploying to Vietnam as an ammunition storage specialist. Always remaining close with his brothers, near the end of his tour he was even able to drive to Quy Nhon to visit Lenny for just two hours. After safely serving one year in-country, Larry was transferred to Ulm, Germany, where he continued to serve until his honorable discharge in 1969 as a Buck Sergeant.

When, to Maebelle’s great relief, Lenny, along with his brothers, returned home safely, they have remained close. In fact Henry, Randy, Donald, Larry and Lenny played on the same bowling team for twenty five years, winning the Connecticut State U.S.B.C Open Tournament in 2012!

Larry is still in Stamford. Now a widower, he and his late wife Betty had three children and five grandchildren. He volunteers at the Bridgeport Veterans Food Pantry with his brother Lenny and is a member of the Faith Tabernacle Baptist Church, St. John’s Lodge #14 and Order of the Eastern Star, Dorcas Chapter #14.

Stamford COTY is pleased to honor Larry Hunter as a distinguished veteran.

Lenny Hunter

U.S. Army

The famous but tragic fate of the five Sullivan brothers, who made the ultimate sacrifice together on the U.S.S. Juneau in World War II, had to be weighing on Maebelle Hunter’s mind when five of her eleven children all joined the military in the middle of the Vietnam War. Henry “Buddy” Hunter, the eldest of the five, joined the Air Force ahead of Donald, Randy, Larry and Lenny, who all volunteered for the Army Signal Corps at a time when many other young men were looking for ways to avoid the unpopular and treacherous trip to the jungles of Indochina. Close throughout their childhood on Spruce Street on Stamford’s West Side, the Hunter brothers were not about to let a mere war come between them.

Lenny, the second youngest of Maebelle’s children attended Stevens Elementary, Rogers Junior High and Stamford High School before joining the U.S. Army on June 23, 1967. Since he was only 17 at the time, his brother Randy had to sign him up because, had she known, he did not think his mother would have allowed it. When he shipped to Vietnam in 1968 with the 578 Signal Company, he spent most of his days stringing communications wire in the jungles by climbing poles that sometimes tapered to the width of a baseball bat, never mind that he was also then exposed to the risk of enemy fire. Not willing to be separated for lon g, he still managed to travel to Cam Ranh Bay to see Henry (and even do some fishing!), and Larry came to see him in Quy Nhon near the end of his tour.

When, to Maebelle’s great relief, Lenny, along with his brothers, returned home safely, they have remained close. In fact Henry, Randy, Donald, Larry and Lenny played on the same bowling team for twenty five years, winning the Connecticut State U.S.B.C Open Tournament in 2012!

Lenny spent his career working for the U.S. Postal Service in Darien, retiring after 37 years. Still active in veterans’ affairs, he is Post Commander at the Darien VFW and volunteers at the Bridgeport Veterans’ Food Pantry. He and his wife Mary, have four children, fourteen grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.

Stamford COTY is grateful to Lenny Hunter, and his four brothers, as distinguished veterans.

John Lund

U.S. Army

Stamford COTY is pleased to honor John Lund as a distinguished veteran.

John was born in Brooklyn, New York, but his family moved to Stamford in 1947 when he was just three months old. He spent his early childhood living in downtown Stamford and attended Elm Street and Rogers Schools, before his family moved to Glenbrook in 1960. He then attended Burdick Junior High and Stamford High, where he graduated in 1965. Always an athlete, John played Little League and Babe Ruth Baseball, Pop Warner Football, Youth Basketball and the Shoreline Softball League. At SHS, he also lettered in varsity soccer.

After the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution expanded U.S. involvement in Vietnam, and knowing he would likely be sent in harm’s way, John joined the United States Marine Corps in August, 1966. After boot camp in Parris Island S.C., combat training in Camp Lejeune, N.C., and assignment to Camp Pendleton near San Diego, he was deployed to Vietnam, where he served nineteen months in-country. There, John was assigned to Mike Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, and spent the first 2 months at a Landing Zone 8 miles South West of Da Nang. During the 1968 Tet Offensive he was moved to Phu Bai for 5 months, and then was assigned to An Hoi for 12 months. During his deployment John was a Casualty Reporter, informing the Company Commander of those Killed or Wounded in Action, and had the painful task of preparing personal effects for shipment. While he was with Mike Company 3/5, they were awarded two Presidential Unit Citations. John individually earned a Meritorious Mast, a Combat Promotion to Sergeant, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, RVN Cross of Gallantry, a Vietnam Service Medal with 1 Star, Combat Action Ribbon and a Navy Achievement Medal with Combat “V”.

Returning home to Stamford, John went to Norwalk Community College for two years, and then transferred to Southern Connecticut State College. He worked at the United States Post Office for 28 years, retiring in 2011, and the Wee Burn Country Club for 48 years, retiring in 2018. He has been married to the love of his life Elaine (Dwyer) for almost 49 years and still lives in Glenbrook. They have two sons–Jeffrey, a Stamford Police Officer and Jonathan, a Stamford Fireman. Jonathan and his wife Natasha have blessed John and Elaine with two granddaughters, five year old Luna and three year old Aila.

Stamford COTY knows we are fortunate to have people like John among us.

William F. Malloy

U.S. Navy

Bill Malloy likes to be around big families. The oldest brother of William and Agnes Malloy’s eight children, Bill grew up on Dartley Street in Belltown, and then on nearby Revonah Avenue. As a member of the third Malloy generation in Stamford, he attended Belltown Elementary, St. John’s Elementary and St. Basil’s Prep, where he graduated in 1960. After high school Bill attended Villanova University where he joined the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC).

After graduation, Bill was assigned to the U.S.S. Independence (CV-62), a more than 1,000-foot- long Forrestal-class Aircraft Carrier deployed with a complement of over 5,000 Navy and Marines (another really big family) to the South China Sea off the coast of Vietnam between May and December of 1965. While onboard he served as an Ensign in the Engineering Department, and he earned the Naval Unit Commendation, the National Defense Medal, and the Vietnam Service Medal. After active duty Bill returned to Stamford, married the love of his life, Evon Deveau, and joined the Naval Reserves where he was honorably discharged as a Lieutenant in 1974.

When he returned Bill also joined his Dad in the insurance business, where he has worked as a licensed insurance agent, a licensed real estate broker and a Certified Insurance Consultant. Bill now owns the William F. Malloy Insurance Agency along with his son, Matthew.

To be sure, Bill still likes to be around a lot of people. He has also served on the Stamford Board of Representatives, as Chairman of the Democratic City Committee, President of the Stamford Hibernians, Rogers School PTO President, a Cub Scout Den Leader, President of the Stamford Youth Hockey Association, President of the Stamford Insurance Board, and Director of the Professional Insurance Association of Connecticut and the Independent Insurance Agents of Connecticut. He is also now serving on the board of Connecticut Renaissance, helping people with substance abuse and mental health issues overcome their challenges.

Not to be outdone by his parents, Bill and his wife of now 52 years, Evon, raised their big family of eleven children in Shippan where they have resided for the last 45 years. Their favorite pastime is spending time with the kids and especially their twenty-two (!) grandchildren.

Stamford COTY is happy to welcome William Malloy to our big family of distinguished veterans

Kimberly Morant

U.S. Navy

Stamford COTY is happy to recognize Kimberly Morant as a distinguished veteran.

Kimberly was born in Stamford on September 14th, 1965. She attended school in Norwalk at Kendall Elementary and Parkway Christian Academy before graduating from Stamford’s Sacred Heart Academy in the class of ‘84. She attended Fisher Junior College, 1984-1985 and Norwalk Community College, 1985-1986. After NCC, Kimberly moved to Richmond, VA where she attended the Geriatric Nursing Assistant Training Program and obtained a position at the Henrico Healthcare Center assisting elderly patients. After marrying, Kimberly moved to Twentynine Palms Marine Base, in San Bernardino County, California where she joined the United States Navy in May of 1992.

In August 1992, Seaman Morant was assigned as hazmat manager to the San Onofre ARD-30, a floating dry dock (used to submerge under ships damaged below the water line and then raise them out of the water for repair). She successfully made sure that all Material Safety Data Sheets were accounted for and filed, thus ensuring that all inspections were performed and passed. She was also responsible for confirming that all supplies were ordered and that hazardous materials were disposed of properly. SN Morant also volunteered for Vietnam Veterans of San Diego. This organization worked with homeless veterans and their families, for substance abuse recovery, mental and emotional health counseling, and most of all, obtaining benefits and jobs.

Since 1998, Kimberly has been the Unit Coordinator for the Tully Endoscopy Center here in Stamford, where she ensures that patient’s paperwork is in order for treatment, and reports to the director of Peri-Op services to record case cancellations and to ensure proper follow-up. She is also certified in phlebotomy and EKG’s.

Kimberly is also program assistant, at the New Canaan YMCA’s special needs program and is a trainer at the Sarner Health and Fitness Center at Tully. Not one to rest on her laurels, she is currently back at Norwalk Community College studying Exercise Science and Social/Behavioral Science where she will graduate in May, and will continue on in Recreational Therapy this fall.

COTY is glad that Stamford has people like Kimberly.